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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
attack damaged a hotel and a u.n. truck. the temporarily mod some damascus based staff to beirut and cairo and has asked all other u.n. personnel in the country to work from home until further note. the fighting in syria, damascus, has escalated in recent months. meanwhile, a bomb attack reportedly injured a rebel leader who was one of the federal to call for the syrian people to rise up against the syrian president. activists say somebody put a bomb in his car, and whoever that somebody is it on the loose and they had to amputate the guy's right leg. in another blow to the rebels, the president of the council has quit. jonathan hunt is with us. the opposition seems to be in chaos in terms of civilian leadership. >> civilian and military. the founder of the free syrian army is the guy who has apparently suffered serious injuries, perhaps even losing a leg, in this car bomb attack. that is a major blow to the unity of the army itself. he has been seen generally as a very effective general. his effectiveness now is obviously going to be in question. on top of that, you have the res
at the u.n. last fall. iran maintains its nuclear program is solely for peaceful energy production. as the arab uprisings convulse the president viewed a missile battery of the iron dome defense system-- heavily financed by the u.s., which knocked scores of rockets from the sky during brief november war with gaza. the president's remarks heavy with allusions to millenia of jewish history in the holy land and a nod to the broad purposes of his trip. >> across this region the winds of change bring both promise and peril. so i see this visit as an opportunity to reaffirm the unbreakable bonds between our nations, to restate america's unwavering commitment to israel's security, and to speak directly to the people of israel and to your neighbors. >> warner: he was referring to another focus of this visit: to listen to what israeli and palestinian leaders say they're willing to do to revive the stalled peace process between them. later at a press conference at the prime minister's jerusalem residence, the president was asked about yesterday's possible chemical weapons attack in northern
here. we just learned that u.n. chief moon says the u.n. will conduct an investigation into the alleged chemical weapons use in syria. earlier this week syrian government and rebels accused each other of launching a deadly chemical attack, but there is no confirmation of those allegations. if true, it would be the first use of such weapons in the conflict. as the president said in israel yesterday, the use of chemical weapons is a game-changer. >>> the pentagon is considering plans for $150 million overhaul of the guantanamo bay detention facility. according to facilities, the multimillion dollar plan would include building a new dining hall, hospital and barracks for the guards. the proposal comes amid mounting signs of frustration from gitmo detainees. u.s. military officials confirm that the number of hunger strikes have tripled over the last two weeks from seven to 25. officials say no lives are in danger, but do acknowledge detainees are growing more frustrated. >> the detainees had -- and their attorneys presumably had great hope that the facility would be closed. and they were pa
, they backed u.n. diplomacy. then they bet on moscow to play a constructive role. predictably, none of this has worked. >> reporter: here in israel today netanyahu's new intelligence minister said, it is apparently clear chemical weapons were used in syria. the republican chairman of the house intelligence committee said he believes chemical weapons were used by the regime with a caveat. >> there is a high probability that a chemical agent was used. again, i would like to see forensic evidence. >> reporter: the u.s. ambassador to syria is in this -- in the sea has been shuttered for more than a year pays on the question of chemical weapons. >> i cannot tell you what happened. i can tell you that we have a large team of people working on it right now. >> reporter: raising the stakes by saying the syrian regime has lost control the border with turkey. meanwhile, in jordan where the president will visit on friday, they are bracing not only for a potential refugee crisis, but also the possibility of assyrian civil war spreading across there border. lou: thank you. ed henry, fox news chief white hou
americans. i really don't think obama went over there to broker any peace deals. netanyahu went to the u.n. and he laid out the time line. he mentioned it was this spring. >> sean: red line? >> he is playing catch-up and for the president to be doing that is embarrassing. he is icing words through weakness. he is not using peace through strength. >> sean: national security for oil. look at north dakota, 3% unemployment. >> i think that obama did something, two good things. one, is to publicly recognize the jewish state and the roots of the jews and religion which was important for the rest of the world. >> sean: is that really so good? >> so for him to say that, it was a good things. and now, he wants the palestinians to recognize the jewish state. this is not going to happen. >> sean: i wanted to get your reaction? >> i spent a good amount of time in israel just over a month ago talking with their ministers and talking with the people. they are guarded. that is the only way i can say. they are guarded about american leadership and they understand our culture. we talk about the red line an
. we have called for and we know that the u.n. is moving forward on investigation of what happened. we're monitoring the situation ourselves. i have said publicly that the use of chemical weapons by the assad regime would be a game-changer from our perspective. because once you let that situation spin out of control, it's very hard to stop and can have enormous spillover effects across the region. and so we are going to continue to closely consult with everybody in the region and do everything we can to bring an end to the bloodshed and to allow the syrian people to get out of a leader who has lost all legitimacy because he is willing to slaughter his own people. and i'm confident that assad will go, it's not a question of if, it's when. and so part of what we have to spend a lot of time thinking about is what's the aftermath of that. and how does that work in a way that actually serves the syrian people. and by the way, serves the syrian people from all walks of life. from all religious affiliations. because one of the things we know is happening in this region is that if we fail to c
are not seeing any of it the way the u.n. rules work. as long as the u.n. is recognizing the assad government that aid is not allowed to go into opposition territory which is where most of the refugees are so a whole calderon of issues. >> changing topics just a bit. some things only happen every four years, presidential elections and olympics and leap years. this weekend the senate did something it hadn't done in more than 1,400 days. they actually passed a budget. the all-night session stretched from thursday night to saturday. keystone lpipeline. they did pass the budget although by a margin of just one vote. >> the average budget resolution considered 78 amendments. we have done 101. the average 35 amendments, we have done 70, twice as many. doing this has been herculean feat. >> i know everyone is exhausted and you may not feel it at the moment but this is one of the senate's finest days in recent years and i commend everyone who has participated in this extraordinary debate. >> not a single republican supported the plan. one of the finest days in the history of the senate. four democrat
mortars fell near a mascus hotel where u.n. staffers have been staying. >> all of the national staff at that office have been asked to work from home until further notice. these measures are being undertaken solely for security reasons. the united nations remains active and committed to helping the syrian side in this political solution. >> this news comes as soil and blood samples are being smuggled out of syria, now in the hands of the u.n. they're testing it for nerve gas after the assad regime and the rebel forces accused one another of shooting off deadly missiles suspected of carrying chemical weapons. >>> and this is a sign you need new brakes. look at this. a cadillac smack dab on a roof of a house in california. the couple inside told our affiliate wabc they were driving down a hill and couldn't stop, turn a corner. next thing they knew, boom, off the road, in the air, on a roof. >> the air bag deployed and i don't even see where we're going from there because the view was obscured and i just couldn't stop. we're very, very lucky. >> so lucky indeed. a neighbor used a ladder
reductions came not because of a carbon tax or a u.n. mandate but market forces and private sector technologies greens oppose. >> the process of fracking natural gas is, creates a significant amount of greenhouse gas emissions. >> reporter: greens also oppose fracking because it does mean more natural gas and lower prices. and that of course makes wind and solar more expensive, jon. you will continue to see the fight over fracking, about carbon taxes and subsidies for wind and solar. back to you. jon: william la jeunesse. good explanation there. thank you. jenna: your chances weren't that great of winning the fourth biggest jackpot in powerball history but somebody out there beat those 175 to 1 odds. how about that? now we're getting some word about where the winning ticket was sold. we'll have those breaking details for you up ahead. >>> the new health care law turns three years old over the weekend. what do we know about its true costs and requirements for everyday americans? we'll take a closer look ahead. [ male announcer ] every famous curve has an equally thrilling, lesser-kn
affect whether there's a reasonable expectation of privacy under the fourth amendment? first u.n. menu. >> eight days. we have a case involving thermal imaging where we needed a warrant for at least a search for officers to look in and see intimate details. one concern i have is an open question as to drones to fly around and not feed images to law-enforcement, they just detect chemicals are scanned for unusual patterns, under the dog sniffing cases, given they are only looking for evidence of illegally to be under the constitution is an open question and one that's key to very well. >> ms. stepanovich. >> jones definitely will impact an individual expectation of privacy. in regard to the chemical sniffers that mr. calo discuss tremendous technology developed by department of defense, dhs in use by the new police department and that can scan for chemical traces down to incredibly small traces you may come into contact with accidentally and people can be triggered as potential targets based on those streets. >> professor calo, private individuals and commercial companies are allowed to
done solely for security reasons after a number of mortar shells reigned down the hotel housing u.n. staff. most employees are being temporarily relocated to buy route and cairo. the move comes as violence rages across the region. a top rebel was wounded and dozens of new deaths being reported just today. >>> it was a sour day on wall street with stocks closing lower amid worries a bailout deal struck in cyprus could set a precedent for other debt-strapped eurozone nations. the s&p, dow can jones and nasdaq all ended down. cyprus struck a deal with european negotiators earlier today, which means big losses at account holders at bankses. >>> it may be spring, but, oh, boy, many parts of the country, including right here in washington, are getting a heavy dose of winter. a powerful storm is packing in some cases historic amounts of snow and blustery winds across the midwest, mid-atlantic, and southern states. winter storm warnings were posted today from new jersey down to north carolina and tennessee, prompting hundreds of flight cancellations and delays. >>> and serious fireworks on
's model n and it's up big. take a look at that, 35%. well, the u.s. national debt continues to barrel towards 17 trillion dollars, going to hit that certainly by september. and now, another example of questionable spending from the federal government. the national institute of health is getting 2.7 million dollars to study why lesbians are at higher risk for hazardous drinking. now this is on top of another study why lesbians are overweight and that's 1.5 million for that one. liz, excessive spending? >> news flash, i'm always curious about the spending on the studies. when does the time clock run out on what we know. we know that excessive drinking is the third preventible cause of death in the country. 220 billion bucks spent because of excessive drinkings, we've known for decades. when does the time clock run out on the research and now what, we have the facts and we have the information, stop it. instead spend the money on that. i think it's, you know, covert pork barrel spending, on facts that we already know. charles: to your point i think if they want the answer they could have
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)